Simple, Basic Soap Recipe Base

handmadesoapbar

I have been meaning to list a simple handmade soap base recipe, but without using Palm oil. Say No To Palm Oil
Any of my recipes can be edited to suit the needs of the crafter. Just always remember to run it back through a lye calculator whenever you make any changes to the oils or size of the batch.

I loved experimenting with different oils, but my two favorite recipes were just so simple. No special label appeal with shea or cocoa butters.. just a basic, creamy good soap.

A 3 base oil Soap recipe

Olive Oil, Coconut Oil and Palm Kernel Oil

1 pound

70%  Olive Oil                11.2 ounces
15% Coconut Oil             2.4 ounces
15% Palm Kernel Oil     2.4 ounces

5% superfat – Lye           2.2 ounces

4 pounds

70% Olive Oil                44.8 ounces
15% Coconut Oil               9.6 ounces
15% Palm Kernel Oil       9.6 ounces

5% superfat – Lye            8.99 ounces

…………
For even more basic, Olive Oil and Palm Kernel Oil

Olive Oil and Palm Kernel Oil

1 pound

80% Olive Oil                          12.8 ounces
20% Palm Kernel Oil             3.2 ounces

5% superfat – Lye                   2.16 ounces

4 pounds

80% Olive Oil                               51.2 ounces
20% Palm Kernel Oil                12.8 ounces

5% superfat – Lye                       8.65 ounces

 

Either of these basic recipes will be a good base for a plain bar of soap, or to add additives and fragrances or essential oils.

You can use either of these bases for just about any recipe on MommaMuse – you can change your liquid (distilled water, teas, milks (read up on using goat milk before trying), cucumber, use your imagination), your fragrances or essential oils, colorants, additives (powders, clays, teas).





How much Liquid should I add?

To figure your liquid, you want 2.2 times the lye amount.  Lye X 2.2 = Liquid in ounces

 

What does ‘superfat’ mean?

When you make soap, the oil molecules bind with the lye molecules.  To make a gentle soap, you want to have a little bit more oil molecules than you do lye.. But at the same time,  not too much more – or you’ll have a soft oily mess of nothing.

 

Cold Process or Hot Process Soap?

Some people have their favorites, I like both ways of making soap.  I have tutorials on how I do each, but mine aren’t the only way to make soap.. there are other variations.  For Cold Process, read Rosemary Mint Cold Process Soap Tutorial with Recipe. For Hot Process, my favorite way is in the crock pot. I recommend getting a crock pot you can use specifically for soap making (check thrift stores, garage sales or ask friends – someone is bound to have one they never use). Instructions for Making Crock Pot Handmade Soap – a ‘how to’ with pictures.
Notes:
– Be sure to use a soap calculator specifically used to calculator amounts, particularly making sure you have the correct amount of sodium hydroxide.
– If you need to make substitutions within your recipe, be sure to recalculate, as the lye amount may change. Don’t just double your recipe, run it through the calculator again. and again. and again.
– Remember your safety and for those around your soap making area. Label items appropriately, wear appropriate safety gear.




Four Foods on Friday

A food meme from Fun, Crafts and Recipes.. visit her site and join the meme.

#1. What’s your favorite potato chip?

I’m not really picky about my pototo chips.. I usually get Mike Sells and Pringles – I think Mike Sells is a semi local chip.. I know they don’t have them in the SE.

#2. Do you use butter, margarine, both or neither?

I use both.. it depends on what I’m cooking. I also like to use oil.. and one of these days I plan to make my own margarine with real butter and olive oil. As an aside, I like Rice Bran oil to cook with too… very nice… right up there with OO. And I use both, depending on what I have on hand, for soapmaking.

#3. What’s your favorite mixed alcoholic (or virgin) drink?

I’m not much of a drinker, but I do like Seagrams wine coolers .. Cherry Fizz is my favorite.. but I like Wild Berries, Daiquiri and Passionate Kiss…

#4. What’s your favorite vegetable and how do you prepare it?

I like so many veggies it’s hard to say.. I like asparagus, chopped and cooked with lots of butter and salt… acorn squash baked with butter, salt and bacon cooked on top… zucchini and yellow squash chopped and steamed (to super softness) with butter and salt… ahhh.. see the butter and salt theme, huh.. lol.

Lavender Soap with Tea Tree Oil and Oatmeal Recipe

Here is another lavender soap variation and it’s another big favorite too.

Lavender and Tea Tree essential oils have long been reputed to have tremendous healing and soothing properties. Lavender essential oil has been known to be soothing to dry, itchy skin; calms the mind and eases stress. Lavender eo has been used to treat various skin disorders because of it’s antiseptic and anti-fungal properties, such as acne, wrinkles, and psoriasis. Tea Tree Oil has been used to treat acne, oily skin, rashes. It is used as an antiseptic as well as a general disinfectant. This soap makes a great face soap, and is easy on baby’s butt, too.

I used a few different base recipes, but my all-time favorite was a very simple one.

Makes 2 pounds

24 oz. Olive Oil (75)
8 oz. Palm Kernel Oil (25%)

4.38 oz. Lye (6% superfat)
8.8 oz. goat milk *

1 oz. lavender essential oil
.5 oz tea tree essential oil
2 TBSP lavender powder
2 TBSP fine oatmeal, powdered

* This is your lye amount x 2.

Lavender tea, water, oatmeal milk, soy milk, all may be substituted for the goatmilk.

Freeze the goat milk in the container used for your lye mixture. Once frozen, very slowly add your lye. Stirring, and slowly adding – this helps prevent the milk from getting hot too fast. I also put my container in a bowl with ice to keep the goat milk and lye mixture as cool as possible.

Once mixed and set to cooling, put aside (in a safe place!).

Measure your Palm Kernel Oil (PKO) and melt (not hot, just melted) – I have used a microwave in the past to do this, just make sure your container is microwave safe. If you are able, a stove top works well. I use a hot plate in my soap workshop and love it – found it pretty cheap at a local flea market.

While your PKO is melting, measure your lavender and tea tree essential oils into a glass container.

Prepare your lavender powder and oatmeal powdered. I buy lavender powder, because it’s really fine.


Making oatmeal powder is a little different. I use a combination of whatever I have on hand, rolled oats, instant and I love using baby oatmeal cereal. Whatever I use, I put in a food processor and zap a few times until really fine. Then I use a screen and collect about 2 tablespoons of fine powder for use in this soap.

Have your mold clean, lined and at the ready.

When your PKO is melted, add the olive oil. Feeling the side of the pot, it should not be hot. A little warm is fine, but generally a the cooler the temperature the better when mixing a goat milk soap (actually, I prefer working with cool temps all the time – more time to mix).

Now, your lye mixture should be cooler to the touch and your oils cooler to the touch… think “luke-warm”.

Have your stick blender (immersion blender) at hand and ready. Slowly add your lye mixture to your oils (note: always add the lye TO the oil). Blending while you pour…

Bring your soap mixture to trace (trace is when your spoon or blender leaves a trail and takes a minute to disappear back into the mixture). Once trace has been reached, add your lavender and oatmeal powders, mixing, then your essential oils, mixing..

Everything should be mixed well, now pour into your mold. I do not insulate my soap, but if you prefer to insulate, what I used to do is put a piece of cardboard on top of my soap, then draped a blanket or a thick towel over it. Then, I put it on a shelf for about 24 hours before I unmold and cut. Once cut, I leave on a shelf for another 24 hours before I bevel edges.

Give it a couple weeks before using, though a good month would be best as the soap will harden up nicely over time.




Olive Oil Properties and Benefits


Olive Oil is a fruit oil obtained from the olive (Olea europaea), a traditional tree crop of the Mediterranean Basin. It is used in cooking, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and soaps, and as a fuel for traditional oil lamps.

Olive oil is a healthful oil because of its high content of monounsaturated fat (mainly oleic acid) and polyphenols. It is also rich in anti-oxidants helping to fight free radicals which cause damage to cells. Olive oil in body care products provides nourishment to the skin, hair and nails.

Olea Europaea (Olive) Oil
Sodium Olivate (Olive Oil Soap)
– A moisturizing oil used in soaps – castile soaps are generally 100% olive oil, but there is no requirement as to what percentage must be used. Olive oil mimics the body’s own natural oils to attract and retain precious moisture to your skin. It softens skin while attracting moisture to your skin. Makes for a mild soap which keeps your skin soft, supple and younger looking.

A soap made with a high percentage of olive oil produces a gentle soap, suitable for young children, or people with sensitive skin.

Olive oil helps relieve itching, stings and bites and may also help in the healing process of burns.

Olive Oil Definitions

* Extra-virgin olive oil (sometimes called EVOO) comes from the first pressing of the olives, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. There can be no refined oil in extra-virgin olive oil.
* Virgin olive oil has an acidity less than 2%, and judged to have a good taste. There can be no refined oil in virgin olive oil.
* Olive oil is a blend of virgin oil and refined oil, containing at most 1% acidity. It commonly lacks a strong flavor.
* Olive-pomace oil is a blend of refined pomace olive oil and possibly some virgin oil. It is fit for consumption, but it may not be called olive oil. Olive-pomace oil is rarely found in a grocery store; it is often used for certain kinds of cooking in restaurants.
* Lampante oil is olive oil not used for consumption; lampante comes from olive oil’s ancient use as fuel in oil-burning lamps. Lampante oil is mostly used in the industrial market.

Olive oil is a heavy oil and ranges in color from pale yellow to dark green.

Creamy Olive Oil Soap Recipe

Creamy Olive Oil Soap

80% Olive Oil
20% Palm Kernel Oil

5% Sodium Hydroxide

1 Pound Recipe:

12.8 oz Olive Oil
3.2 Palm Kernel Oil

2.18 Sodium Hydroxide

To figure water, a safe range would be to multiply the lye amount by 2.2. I usually use a range somewhere between 1.7 and 2.0 for figuring my liquid requirements. For new recipes, I recommend 2.2.

Note:
Momma Muse recommends always running your recipe through a soap calculator to ensure you are using safe amounts of lye. See a list of online lye calculators.

For properties on other oils to use in your soap making recipes, see
Ingredient and Oil Properties for Soap, Lotion, Serums, Bath and Body

Notes:
– Be sure to use a soap calculator specifically used to calculator amounts, particularly making sure you have the correct amount of sodium hydroxide.
– If you need to make substitutions within your recipe, be sure to recalculate, as the lye amount may change.
– Remember your safety and for those around your soap making area. Label items appropriately, wear appropriate safety gear.

Momma Muse, and Judi Cox, is in no way held liable for your soap making adventures or misadventures. Though we are happy to share your experiences, should you wish. 🙂

Basic Olive Oil Soap Recipe


I finally have a couple of alternative Basic Soap Recipes to use that do not include Palm Oil.

One of my favorite soaps, in fact, is just and Olive Oil and Palm Kernel Oil – and you can add in whatever scents and goodies you want.

Basic Palm Oil- Free Soap recipes – makes a great starter base.

 

Basic Olive Oil Soap Recipe

60% Olive Oil
15% Palm Oil
15% Palm Kernel Oil
10% Coconut Oil

5% Sodium Hydroxide

…………..
1 lb Recipe:

9.6 oz Olive Oil
2.4 oz Palm Oil
2.4 oz Palm Kernel Oil
1.6 oz Coconut Oil

2.24 oz Sodium Hydroxide

…………..
2 lb Recipe:

19.2 oz Olive Oil
4.8 oz Palm Oil
4.8 oz Palm Kernel Oil
3.2 oz Coconut Oil

4.48 oz Sodium Hydroxide

To figure water, a safe range would be to multiply the lye amount by 2.2. I usually use a range somewhere between 1.7 and 2.0 for figuring my liquid requirements. For new recipes, I recommend 2.2. In this case 4.8 x 2.2 = 10.56 oz

Note:
Always your recipe through a soap calculator to ensure you are using safe amounts of lye. See a list of online lye calculators.

For properties on other oils to use in your soap making recipes, see
Ingredient and Oil Properties for Soap, Lotion, Serums, Bath and Body

Notes:
– Be sure to use a soap calculator specifically used to calculator amounts, particularly making sure you have the correct amount of sodium hydroxide.
– If you need to make substitutions within your recipe, be sure to recalculate, as the lye amount may change.
– Remember your safety and for those around your soap making area. Label items appropriately, wear appropriate safety gear.




Oatmeal Milk and Honey Handmade Soap

Oatmeal Milk and Honey Soap Recipe

Delicious! Ok, so soap isn’t suppose to smell good enough to eat, but this one does! Be sure to tell the kids the bar of soap is NOT a cookie. The scent of almond is enough to make you wonder ‘where’re grandma’s cookies?’.

Tasty smells aren’t your thing? Mine either, typically. I have been told time and again that this is the most awesome scented soap! It’s a huge favorite. And as much as I don’t care for those tasty fragrances, this one rocks! You’ll want everyone to smell it (it’s just that good!) and then you’ll realize it’s time to hide it so you can savor it all for yourself – yes, it really is that good!

Here’s one of my favorite soap recipes. It’s simple and easy to remember.

Creamy Olive Oil Soap Recipe


80% Olive Oil
20% Palm Kernel Oil

5% Sodium Hydroxide

1 Pound Recipe:

12.8 oz Olive Oil
3.2 Palm Kernel Oil

2.18 Sodium Hydroxide

To figure liquid*, a safe range would be to multiply the lye amount by 2.2. I usually use a range somewhere between 1.7 and 2.0 for figuring my liquid requirements. For new recipes, I recommend 2.2.

If you want to use real Milk, like goat milk or buttermilk, then you want to measure your needed amount and put it in the freezer. Goat milk will get hot fast when you add the lye to it, so making a frozen slush of it is the way to go.

Now, you’re down to the nitty-gritty details of goodness for this soap.

1 TBS Honey, per pound of soap
1 TBS finely ground Toasted oatmeal
1 oz, per pound, OMH fragrance oil**

**You can leave it out the fragrance oil and it’s all good and yummy. But if you want an extra special kick to it, one that will make all your gift recipients sigh when they smell it, you need to add some ‘Oatmeal Milk & Honey’ fragrance oil to it. My absolute favorite Oatmeal Milk and Honey fragrance oil is by Brambleberry.

If you want a soap with more lather, reduce the amount of olive oil to 65% and add 15% Coconut Oil.
Remember ANY change you make to a recipe, or any time you make a new recipe, be sure to run it through a lye calculator to ensure you won’t be “lye heavy” and your percentages are correct!

Like with my Lavender Oatmeal soap, I like to toast my oatmeal… Here’s how I make my Powdered oatmeal – I toast whole oats in the oven until lightly browned. Then I ground very fine in a coffee bean grinder. Same as the lavender powder, my typical usage rate is about a tablespoon per pound of oils. I also like to add a bit of organic baby oatmeal cereal. I like that it has the extra vitamins. Whether they hold up in the soap process or not, the idea is nice.