Simple, Basic Soap Recipe Base

handmadesoapbar

I have been meaning to list a simple handmade soap base recipe, but without using Palm oil. Say No To Palm Oil
Any of my recipes can be edited to suit the needs of the crafter. Just always remember to run it back through a lye calculator whenever you make any changes to the oils or size of the batch.

I loved experimenting with different oils, but my two favorite recipes were just so simple. No special label appeal with shea or cocoa butters.. just a basic, creamy good soap.

A 3 base oil Soap recipe

Olive Oil, Coconut Oil and Palm Kernel Oil

1 pound

70%  Olive Oil                11.2 ounces
15% Coconut Oil             2.4 ounces
15% Palm Kernel Oil     2.4 ounces

5% superfat – Lye           2.2 ounces

4 pounds

70% Olive Oil                44.8 ounces
15% Coconut Oil               9.6 ounces
15% Palm Kernel Oil       9.6 ounces

5% superfat – Lye            8.99 ounces

…………
For even more basic, Olive Oil and Palm Kernel Oil

Olive Oil and Palm Kernel Oil

1 pound

80% Olive Oil                          12.8 ounces
20% Palm Kernel Oil             3.2 ounces

5% superfat – Lye                   2.16 ounces

4 pounds

80% Olive Oil                               51.2 ounces
20% Palm Kernel Oil                12.8 ounces

5% superfat – Lye                       8.65 ounces

 

Either of these basic recipes will be a good base for a plain bar of soap, or to add additives and fragrances or essential oils.

You can use either of these bases for just about any recipe on MommaMuse – you can change your liquid (distilled water, teas, milks (read up on using goat milk before trying), cucumber, use your imagination), your fragrances or essential oils, colorants, additives (powders, clays, teas).





How much Liquid should I add?

To figure your liquid, you want 2.2 times the lye amount.  Lye X 2.2 = Liquid in ounces

 

What does ‘superfat’ mean?

When you make soap, the oil molecules bind with the lye molecules.  To make a gentle soap, you want to have a little bit more oil molecules than you do lye.. But at the same time,  not too much more – or you’ll have a soft oily mess of nothing.

 

Cold Process or Hot Process Soap?

Some people have their favorites, I like both ways of making soap.  I have tutorials on how I do each, but mine aren’t the only way to make soap.. there are other variations.  For Cold Process, read Rosemary Mint Cold Process Soap Tutorial with Recipe. For Hot Process, my favorite way is in the crock pot. I recommend getting a crock pot you can use specifically for soap making (check thrift stores, garage sales or ask friends – someone is bound to have one they never use). Instructions for Making Crock Pot Handmade Soap – a ‘how to’ with pictures.
Notes:
– Be sure to use a soap calculator specifically used to calculator amounts, particularly making sure you have the correct amount of sodium hydroxide.
– If you need to make substitutions within your recipe, be sure to recalculate, as the lye amount may change. Don’t just double your recipe, run it through the calculator again. and again. and again.
– Remember your safety and for those around your soap making area. Label items appropriately, wear appropriate safety gear.




How to Make Powdered Laundry Soap – homemade

You may have seen my post about making Liquid Laundry Soap. Almost two years later, I am finally getting around to adding my Powdered Laundry Soap Tutorial. (About time!)

Honestly, I prefer this powdered recipe over the liquid one.. either way, they both save money.





Ingredients to gather:
Washing Soda (I use Arm & Hammer)
Borax (20 Mule Team Laundry Booster)
Fels Naptha (stain pre-treatment bar)

It shouldn’t be too hard to find the ingredients at your local grocery. If you can’t find something, you can always order it online.

Grate about 2 cups of the Fels Naptha.

One cup each of the Laundry Booster and Washing Soda.
borax ingredient for powdered laundry soap

washing soda for powdered laundry soap

We had some clumps, so we took a fork and broke up any clumps (tiny ones we didn’t worry about).

Add in the Fels Naptha (if you haven’t already). Mix together well.

I divided the recipe into 2 smaller containers with lids.. with lids on tightly, I handed over to my helpers, who shook the containers until all ingredients were well mixed.
mix all ingredients well - shake shake shake

I did not add any essential oils or fragrance to this recipe. If I wanted a fragrance added, I’d put around 15 to 20 drops in with the Fel Naptha and coat it well, then spread on a lined cookie sheet to dry over night. Then add that the rest of the mixture and mix well.

To use: 1 to 2 Tablespoon(s) per load.




Rosemary Mint Cold Process Soap Tutorial with Recipe

In doing some updates on MommaMuse, I realized I didn’t have a dedicated post for my Rosemary Mint Soap recipe. It is included on my Crock Pot Soap Making Tutorial, but it’s such a good soap, it deserves a post all to its self… Instead of just sharing the recipe, I ended up with a Tutorial on how to make cold process soap.


Gather your ingredients and additives:

Rosemary Mint Handmade Soap
4 pounds
– 38 ounces olive oil (59.38%)
– 14.4 ounces palm kernel oil (22.5%)
– 11.6 ounces palm oil (18.13%)
– 8.7 ounces sodium hydroxide (5% discount)
– 17.5 ounces distilled water
– 3 ounces rosemary mint blend essential oils
– 2 teabags of Organic Peppermint tea

This soap makes a 4 pound batch. That may be a bit large, or too small, for your needs, so the percentage is included to help you downsize (or up-size, as the case may be).

If you follow the link for the Crock Pot Soap tutorial, you’ll find step-by-step instructions, including pictures, on how to make it with your crock pot. One thing I really like about the crock pot is that it produces a sort of translucent soap.. it’s a very lovely soap. But, you may prefer the cold process of soap making.

This process may be used for any soap recipe. Read through the directions before starting, to familiarize yourself with the process.

1. Measure your solid oils and melt them over low heat.
Melt your measured oils for soap recipe

2. a. While your oils are melting over low heat, measure you liquid (in this recipe, distilled water) in a dedicated lye mixture container – this is something you will not use for anything but your lye mixture.

2. b. Measure you lye, and add your lye TO your water. note: Always add the lye TO the water to avoid sudden splash-up. This will heat up pretty hot.. so set it aside to cool.. or you could put it outside (if it’s cool/cold) or in the fridge (Be sure you container is labeled clearly so no one uses it, and be careful in moving it around so as not to spill it).. so, your lye mixture is mixed and cooling.

2. c. You could use extra tea bags to make a tea with the distilled water. Steep the teabags, as you would when making tea. Allow the tea to cool. Make sure you use more water than is called for for the recipe, so when the wet tea bags are removed, you’ve got enough water left to make the lye mixture. Cool, or chill, measure and then follow steps above for the lye mixture.

3. Measure out your extra ingredients. Set aside.
– In one bowl measure your fragrance or essential oils.
– In another bowl, open the tea bags, so the teas are loose.
Measuring Soap ingredients

4. Make sure your soap mold is clean, lined and ready to use. My first soap mold was an old cigar box. I then made myself a flat, square wooden mold. I lined each of these with freezer paper, or wax paper. Once I started making soaps for sale, my husband made me wooden molds that produced nice soap logs. One short end was able to screw on and off, for easy log-removal. I used high temperature quilting mylar (found in the quilt section of your local fabric shop – make sure to get high temperature), cut to fit all four sides and the bottom.
Soap Mold

5. Once your solid oils are melted, add your olive oil. This will help bring down the temperature of you melted oils. You want your melted oils to be close to room temperature when you add your lye mixture. I found room temperature (or the slightly cooler) was best when combining your lye mixture to your oils.

When the temps are warmer it seems to speed up ‘trace’ (when the mixtures thickens), causing the combined lye mixture and oils to thicken up faster. This could be a problem if you are adding colorants, or other additives, when you need a few extra minutes to get things mixed well.

6. Add your lye mixture to the oils, and with your handy-dandy stick blender and begin mixing and blending. Mix and blend, mix and blend.
Blending lye and oil mixture for soap making tutorial.

7. When you see a light trace.. this will be like a “trail” that is left when you move the stick blender through the soap mix. It will take a few seconds to melt away on its own.
Reaching Trace - soap making tutorial

Trace has been reached.. now it’s time to add your fragrance or essential oils and your loose tea. Blend it in well and get ready to pour it into the prepared mold.

8. Pour gently, so as not to splash up, the soap into the mold.
Soap poured into soap mold

9. Set aside to finish the saponification (this is what the chemical process of the lye mixture and the oils go through in order to “change” and make soap) process. Some people like to “insulate” their soap while it goes through this process. To do this, you can wrap it in a towel or blanket. I would put a folded towel on the rack (or table or shelf) and then lay a piece of saran wrap across the top of the soap and then put another folded towel on top. This helps contain the heat of the soap. OR, if you mold fits in your oven, you can turn your oven on low heat (about 175 degrees) and let it sit in there over night.

10. Now, you’ve got a sink full of dirty dishes. What I like to do it rinse the bowl with the fragrance oil and set aside. Leave the dirty pot you mixed your soap in until the next day. If you wash it right after making your soap, it will be greasy / oily feeling and won’t wash well. If you leave it until the next day, it will have hardened up, and when you wash it, you won’t have to add any soap to wash it, because it’ll be lined with soap! Add some hot water, and see how well it bubbles. Mmm.. and it smells good too. 😉

11. It’s 24 hours later, give or take, and you’re ready to unmold your soap. Yay! Gently remove the soap from the mold.
Handmade soap log

12. Slice and allow to cure… 3 or 4 months is good, if you can wait that long. Your soap will harden up and shrink some, as the remaining liquid is evaporated from the soap. If you can’t wait long, give it a week or so before you use it. It won’t be as good as it will be in a few months, but it will work.
handmade soap log and cut soaps

This soap is not suitable for your face or ‘tender parts’. It makes a wonderful wake-me-up morning soap, but do be careful where you use it. Or in a soap tray for hand washing. It’s great for after cooking and gardening.

If you are looking for a soap for your face (and all over parts), try Nana’s Lavender Goat Milk Soap Recipe, or it’s Vegan alternative Nana’s Vegan Lavender Soap recipe.



Soap Making Recipes FAQ

I’ve gotten many great questions on the comments to some of my soap recipes. I thought I’d add some of the most important ones into one FAQ for ease of accessibility.

Q: Can I substitute one oil for a different one?

A: Yes, absolutely. But, be aware that certain oils behave differently, or have different properties, and it may not turn out to exactly what you want. I won’t pat myself on the back and say that my recipe is the best. 😉 But I will highly recommend that if you switch one oil out for another, you do a test batch to determine if the end result will meet your expectations.





Remember – if you substitute one oil for another, in a soap recipe, you MUST run the recipe back through a lye calculator – This is not optional. This is absolute, you HAVE to do this, to ensure you are mixing the right amount of lye / water to your oils. If you don’t, it could mean a soap that won’t harden, at the least, and at worst, a soap that may actually burn someones skin, or worse.

Here’s more information on Oil Properties for your Soap, Lotion or bath / body oils.

Q: Megan asks: “What about substituting coconut oil for PKO? It’s a lot easier for me to find.”

A: You can use coconut oil, but you don’t really want to use more than 15 or 20% – even at 20% it can be drying. Regardless, whatever you do to substitute, make sure you run the recipe back through a lye calculator. Each oil is different and requires a different amount of lye to make soap – soap that won’t burn 😉 or end up too soft.

Q: Jami aks: “Can you use this recipe follow a crock pot hot process?”

A: Sure – all of my recipes can be used to make crock pot / hot process soap. Just follow the Instructions for Crock Pot Hot Process Soap using the ingredients from this recipe. It’s super simple… and you know when it’s done, it’s good to use – though, letting it cure a few weeks to even a few months will allow it harden quite a bit more.

Jami tried it and had this to say:
“I made this recipe using the crock pot method on this site and it turned out wonderfully! I didn’t have lavender powder so I just added lavender flowers and it looks great. I tested the recipe and it lathers so nice and feels so good. And my hands are nicely cleaned! Thanks for the wonderful instructions and recipe!”

I just want to make a note about using lavender flowers. If you use lavender flowers IN the soap, when the soap cures, those once pretty little flowers can turn out looking rather like … erm… mouse poop.. so I’d suggest making your soap and then sprinkling springs of lavender across the top, or even tying small bunches of lavender flowers sprigs to the soap.

Q: Dayna asks: “Could rose eo and rose powder be substituted for the lavender and still be safe for the face?”

A: The simple answer is yes, absolutely. Rose is good for the skin, even the face. However, your bank account may disagree. Rose eo can be very costly; and you’ll need about 1/2 ounce per pound of soap. Rose powder would be great, as well as rose clay (this will give it a lovely color too). I get rose water to use in my facial creams, but I’m not sure the lovely, soft scent would come through in the soap. You could compromise and use rose powder, rose clay, rose water, rose buds / flowers, and then use some rose fragrance oil rather than essential oi – unless, of course, you aren’t concerned with the cost factor.


In regards to Substitutions:
In general, fragrances, essential oils, powders, clays, or spices (primarily used as natural colorants), micas, teas, etc, generally don’t change the outcome of the basic soap recipe.. But there could be some changes…

For instance, my Nana’s Lavender Soap recipe calls for lavender powder. The powder, even though it’s very fine does make a fine exfoliating soap. If you wanted to make this soap for a baby, leave out the powder, and it will be a soft, creamy, use-it-on-the-most-delicate-skin soap.

Q: Pam says: “Thanks for sharing so many different recipes. I’ve started making my own lotion and love the variety I can produce just by altering the ingredients with something I like. Keep up the good work!”

A: No, that wasn’t a question, but I wanted to put it out there and respond to it. I love that Pam is altering ingredients and creating a product that works for her.

I always try to view a recipe as a guideline – and I encourage others to do so too. If you don’t want to use a specific oil, or it’s not readily available to you, find one that is, with similar properties and make a small test batch to see if it produces something more suited to your needs.




How To Make Homemade Liquid Laundry Soap

(This recipe is for Liquid Laundry Soap. Here’s a Powdered Laundry Soap Tutorial.)

Have you ever wondered how easy it would be to make your own homemade liquid laundry soap? This recipe is not only easy, the cost is less than a few dollars per batch and each batch makes enough for 110 loads of laundry.


This liquid laundry soap works Great for High Efficiency washers as it’s not a super sudsy soap.

The ingredients you’ll need should be available at your local grocery stores or maybe big box stores.

1 cup – 20 Mule Team Borax
1/2 cup – Arm & Hammer Washing Soda
1 bar of ivory soap (I used my own handmade soap and part of a bar of castile)
Large clean bucket enough to hold 3 gallons of water easily – I used a 5 gallon bucket we acquired from a fast food restaurant – it used to be filled with bags of pickles.. we got it free.
Water
Essential Oil or Fragrance Oil (optional)
– 1/8 ounce to 1 ounce

The ingredients are simple enough. Should only cost maybe $10 if you are purchasing the boxes for the first time. The two boxes of powders will last you through several batches (or use to make powdered laundry soap, or even liquid hand soap).

First, shave your bar of soap using a peeler. I used 1/3 bar of castile and a 1/2 bar of handmade soap

Once your soap is in small pieces, place a pot on the stove big enough to hold 5 cups of water. Bring the water to a boil. When it begins to boil, lower heat to simmer and put the soap in the water. I covered with a lid and let it sit.

While your soap is melting, add 3 gallons of hot water to your bucket. For ease, I used a 2 qt pitcher to fill it.

To the hot water, add 1 cup of Borax and 1/2 cup of Washing Soda. Stir with long handled spoon until dissolved.

Add the melted soap water to the bucket and stir well. If you want to add any fragrance, add it now. Since I make soap, I have tons of fragrances around. I used one called Eucalyptus Thymes – I got from a place called Sweet Cakes (their eucalyptus is the best clean smell – not like medicinal eucalyptus). Or add essential oils. If you plan to make your soaps regularly and want it fragrances, I’d suggest finding a good soap/candle supply company (maybe one local to you?) and order it – it’s Much cheaper to order your essential oils and fragrances rather than purchase from the health food store or craft store.

How much Essential Oils or Fragrance oils:
I would say it’s up to you.. but somewhere between 1/4 ounce to a full ounce.. completely depending on your sensitivity, preferences and the scent. Remember, some scents are stronger than others and adjust accordingly.  You need less essential oils than fragrance oils.




Cover the bucket and set aside for 24 hours. Your soap may be watery or gel up in areas, may be slightly lumpy in areas. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Make sure to smoosh up the clumps when you add it to the washer. If you have smaller containers to put your in, it may be easier to handle – I have old detergent bottles and filled mine with my “new” soap. My soap is very watery – but very soapy.

This makes over 110 loads of liquid laundry soap – and you only need to use about a 1/2 cup.

Making Aromatherapy Massage Bath Oil

Have you ever wondered how to make your own scented massage oil?


You can easily make your own massaging, moisturizing scented oil at home rather than buy it. I love using scented oils after a shower or bath particularly during the cooler weather. I put the oil all over just before toweling off. Afterwards, my skin is so silky soft and smooth. Plus, you will know exactly what goes into your massage oils and you will also be able to adjust it to suit your tastes and your body’s needs.

I like to infuse lavender into my oil. This year, I grew my own lavender. I’ll add a few sprigs to a small bottle of light olive oil and let it sit on the window sill and soak up the lavender goodness for a few weeks. Then, when I am ready to make an “after bath oil” I’ll use a bit of my lavender infused olive oil.

Olive oil is so easily attainable, I keep it on hand for cooking, soaping and bath & body. It’s a moisturizing oil, soothing and healing to all skin types.

Sweet almond oil is an excellent skin softener and moisturizer. Almond oil is great for all skin types but especially beneficial for dry or irritated skin.

Jojoba oil contains protein and minerals. It is similar to our own sebum which is secreted by our glands, helping lubricate, as well as, protect our skin. Not good for use at 100%, but adding to your base oil(s) in a small amount would be beneficial (but not necessary). This is, however, a nice oil to use to make a “perfume oil”. Use about 50 drops of your essential oil per 1 ounce of jojoba. Please be sure to research your essential oils prior to using at that strength however, as some EOs could be harmful in a high quanitity.

Grapeseed oil is a great massage oil. It has good “slip” and absorbs easily into the skin. It is mildly astringent and has regenerative qualities which help to tighten and tone the skin making it useful for skin issues such as acne, as well as repairing skin and cell membranes – use this one for stretchmarks pregnant momma!

Sesame oil is a great massage oil, penetrates the skin easily nourishing and detoxifying deep tissue layers. Because of it’s antioxidant properties some claim when used regularly, it’s also reduced stress and tension, promoting strength and vitality. Plus it’s great for wrinkle reduction! And it may even soothe minor burns or sunburns. Sesame oil is also a good base oil for perfume too.

These aren’t the only oils you may use, just a few – some are easier to find than others, like at the local grocery or specialty shop… or you may want to find a place online to purchase them. If you can’t find them, you should be able to find it at a few places which sell soap supplies.

These oils may be used in a blend, or on their own (except the jojoba, mix it with another base oil as stated).

Or go Aromatherapy — You may also wish to add scented essential oils, such as lavender or jasmine (not to be used in pregnancy), for an aromatherapy massage blend. Add 10-20 drops of your essential oil to per 1 ounce of carrier oil, depending on which essential oil(s) you choose.

Some essential oils shouldn’t be used under certain conditions, be sure you research which oils you’d like to use to ensure your safety and those using your oils.

Soft & Silky Handmade Lotion Recipe

This is one of my favorite lotions, moisturizing without leaving an oily feel on the skin.

Oil Phase:
9 oz sweet almond oil
3 oz jojoba oil
6 oz grapeseed oil
1 oz wheatgerm oil
2.5 oz stearic acid (used to thicken lotion)
2.5 oz ewax (thickens lotions; allows water and oil to blend)
3 oz shea butter

Water Phase:
44 oz distilled water
.6 oz citric acid (used to soften water)
1.8 oz glycerin
2 oz hydrolized wheat protein
1 oz rose hydrosol*
1 oz lavender hydrosol*

.8 oz fragrance (optional)
.7 optiphen (preservative)

* hydrosols are option, if unavailable, just up your water amount.


Separated Steps:
1. Combine all oil phase ingredients, except shea butter in a pan or microwave safe bowl. Heat over low on stove or in microwave until ewax is melted. Once melted, remove from heat, add shea butter and allow to melt.
2. Combine water phase ingredients, heating over low heat until citric acid is disolved.
3. Combine oil and water ingredients and mix with mixer on low until cool.
4. Add fragrance and preservative, blending until well incorporated.
5. Pour into sterilized containers

I combine my steps to speed the process, with no ill effects. Here’s how I do it now:
1. Combine all ingredients, except fragrance and preservative.
2. Heat until melted.
3. Blend in a mixer (I have a kitchen aid that works awesomely for lotion making).
4. Once fairly cool to the touch (think “luke-warm”), I add my fragrance oil and preservative.
5. Continue mixing to ensure the last ingredients are well incorporated.
6. Pour into sterilized containers.

Lotion Percentages will provide percentage information, to allow you to make your own lotion recipe. Or experiment with the ingredients in this recipe – each oil you substitute may result in a different feel to the end product. I’d suggest making a smaller batch while you experiment.

Lavender Soap with Tea Tree Oil and Oatmeal Recipe

Here is another lavender soap variation and it’s another big favorite too.

Lavender and Tea Tree essential oils have long been reputed to have tremendous healing and soothing properties. Lavender essential oil has been known to be soothing to dry, itchy skin; calms the mind and eases stress. Lavender eo has been used to treat various skin disorders because of it’s antiseptic and anti-fungal properties, such as acne, wrinkles, and psoriasis. Tea Tree Oil has been used to treat acne, oily skin, rashes. It is used as an antiseptic as well as a general disinfectant. This soap makes a great face soap, and is easy on baby’s butt, too.

I used a few different base recipes, but my all-time favorite was a very simple one.

Makes 2 pounds

24 oz. Olive Oil (75)
8 oz. Palm Kernel Oil (25%)

4.38 oz. Lye (6% superfat)
8.8 oz. goat milk *

1 oz. lavender essential oil
.5 oz tea tree essential oil
2 TBSP lavender powder
2 TBSP fine oatmeal, powdered

* This is your lye amount x 2.

Lavender tea, water, oatmeal milk, soy milk, all may be substituted for the goatmilk.

Freeze the goat milk in the container used for your lye mixture. Once frozen, very slowly add your lye. Stirring, and slowly adding – this helps prevent the milk from getting hot too fast. I also put my container in a bowl with ice to keep the goat milk and lye mixture as cool as possible.

Once mixed and set to cooling, put aside (in a safe place!).

Measure your Palm Kernel Oil (PKO) and melt (not hot, just melted) – I have used a microwave in the past to do this, just make sure your container is microwave safe. If you are able, a stove top works well. I use a hot plate in my soap workshop and love it – found it pretty cheap at a local flea market.

While your PKO is melting, measure your lavender and tea tree essential oils into a glass container.

Prepare your lavender powder and oatmeal powdered. I buy lavender powder, because it’s really fine.


Making oatmeal powder is a little different. I use a combination of whatever I have on hand, rolled oats, instant and I love using baby oatmeal cereal. Whatever I use, I put in a food processor and zap a few times until really fine. Then I use a screen and collect about 2 tablespoons of fine powder for use in this soap.

Have your mold clean, lined and at the ready.

When your PKO is melted, add the olive oil. Feeling the side of the pot, it should not be hot. A little warm is fine, but generally a the cooler the temperature the better when mixing a goat milk soap (actually, I prefer working with cool temps all the time – more time to mix).

Now, your lye mixture should be cooler to the touch and your oils cooler to the touch… think “luke-warm”.

Have your stick blender (immersion blender) at hand and ready. Slowly add your lye mixture to your oils (note: always add the lye TO the oil). Blending while you pour…

Bring your soap mixture to trace (trace is when your spoon or blender leaves a trail and takes a minute to disappear back into the mixture). Once trace has been reached, add your lavender and oatmeal powders, mixing, then your essential oils, mixing..

Everything should be mixed well, now pour into your mold. I do not insulate my soap, but if you prefer to insulate, what I used to do is put a piece of cardboard on top of my soap, then draped a blanket or a thick towel over it. Then, I put it on a shelf for about 24 hours before I unmold and cut. Once cut, I leave on a shelf for another 24 hours before I bevel edges.

Give it a couple weeks before using, though a good month would be best as the soap will harden up nicely over time.




Nana’s Vegan Lavender Soap Recipe

This lavender soap recipe was created for vegan friends and family. It contains no animal bi-products, and is gentle and soothing to sensitive skin. [Updated recipes at bottom of post to include no palm or pko and another for just a castile.]

If you’re not vegan, you can try Nana’s Lavender Goat Milk Soap, a creamy soap that is also gentle on all skin types.

Lavender essential oil has been known to be soothing to dry, itchy skin; calms the mind and eases stress. Lavender eo has been used to treat various skin disorders because of it’s antiseptic and anti-fungal properties, such as acne, wrinkles, and psoriasis. Adding lavender oil to chamomile helps eczema.

I used a few different base recipes, but my all-time favorite was a very simple one.


2 pounds

24 oz. Olive Oil (75)
8 oz. Palm Kernel Oil (25%)

4.38 oz. Lye (6% superfat)
8.8 oz. lavender tea *

1.5 oz. lavender essential oil
2 TBSP lavender powder

* This is your liquid and it determined by your lye amount x 2.

[See bottom of post for information regarding PKO not being considered Vegan – and an alternate, simple recipe.]

To make lavender tea, heat water amount (plus extra a little extra) to boiling. Pour over lavender buds and let infuse for 10 minutes or more. I usually do this the night before and leave to infuse the whole time. Once done, filter out the lavender buds and chill the tea.

When the tea is sufficiently chilled, add your lye (remember, add your lye TO the tea, not the other way around). I put my lye mixture container into a bowl a cold water to cool – (sometimes adding ice, depending on how quickly I’m wanting to get things going).

Once mixed and set to cooling, put aside (in a safe place!).

Measure your Palm Kernel Oil (PKO) and melt (not hot, just melted) – I have used a microwave in the past to do this, just make sure your container is microwave safe. If you are able, a stove top works well.

While your PKO is melting, measure your lavender essential oil and lavender powder into separate containers (I always use glass for my essential and fragrance oils).

Have your mold clean, lined and at the ready.

When your PKO is melted, add the olive oil. Feeling the side of the pot, it should not be hot. I prefer working with all the ingredients at a luke-warm temperature. It allows for more time.


Now, your lye mixture should be cooler to the touch and your oils cooler to the touch… again, think “luke warm”.

Have your stick blender (immersion blender) at hand and ready. Slowly add your lye mixture to your oils (note: always add the lye TO the oil). Blending while you pour…

Bring your soap mixture to trace (trace is when your spoon or blender leaves a trail and takes a minute to disappear back into the mixture). Once trace has been reached, add your lavender powder, mixing, then your essential oil, mixing..

Everything should be mixed well, now pour into your mold. I do not insulate my soap, I put it on a shelf for about 24 hours before I unmold and cut. Once cut, I leave on a shelf for another 24 hours before I bevel edges.

Give it a couple weeks before using, though a good month would be best as the soap will harden up nicely over time.





UPDATE

In a recent comment, Lisa informs me that PKO, palm kernel oil, is not considered vegan.  I am unable find any information to support that it is not vegan – however there is a lot of information regarding palm oil and the destruction from it’s harvesting.  I have, on the other hand, found sites where people do consider PKO vegan.  Whether you consider it vegan or not, the choice to use it is up to the soap maker.

I prefer really simple recipes – it’s not only easier on the pocket book, but it’s easier to make – and then I can add my extra goodies to spice it up.  Here is a recipe using coconut instead of PKO – coconut is derived from the Coconut Palm (not the same plant that palm or pko come from).

2 pounds – No PKO

25.5 oz. Olive Oil (~80%)
6.5 oz. Coconut Oil (~20%)

4.37 oz. Lye (6% superfat)
8.8 oz. lavender tea *

1.5 oz. lavender essential oil
2 TBSP lavender powder

* This is your liquid and it determined by your lye amount x 2.

….

If you want a true Castile Soap, use only Olive Oil:

2 pounds Castile Soap

32 oz. Olive Oil (100%)

4.07 oz. Lye (6% superfat)

8.2 oz. lavender tea *

1.5 oz. lavender essential oil
2 TBSP lavender powder

* This is your liquid and it determined by your lye amount x 2.

Castile takes longer to cure, but makes a very hard, long lasting bar of soap.

Enjoy!

 

Nana’s Lavender Goatmilk Soap Recipe

This was one of my favorites, and one that always flew off my shelf – I just couldn’t keep it in stock!

This is a lovely, creamy soap that is gentle on all skin types – from baby skin to problem skin such as eczema and psoriasis. If you’d rather try a vegan recipe, try Nana’s Vegan Lavender Soap Recipe – it’s a perfect alternative, no less wonder and gentle.

Lavender essential oil has been known to be soothing to dry, itchy skin; calms the mind and eases stress. Lavender eo has been used to treat various skin disorders because of it’s antiseptic and anti-fungal properties, such as acne, wrinkles, and psoriasis. Adding lavender oil to chamomile helps eczema.

I used a few different base recipes, but my all-time favorite was a very simple one. Momma Muse has several lavender soap recipes – many are, or can be made, vegan friendly.


2 pounds

24 oz. Olive Oil (75)
8 oz. Palm Kernel Oil (25%)

4.38 oz. Lye (6% superfat)
8.8 oz. goat milk *

1.5 oz. lavender essential oil
2 TBSP lavender powder

* This is your lye amount x 2.

Freeze the goat milk in the container used for your lye mixture. Once frozen, very slowly add your lye. Stirring, and slowly adding – this helps prevent the milk from getting hot too fast. I also put my container in a bowl with ice to keep the goat milk and lye mixture as cool as possible.

Once mixed and set to cooling, put aside (in a safe place!).

Measure your Palm Kernel Oil (PKO) and melt (not hot, just melted) – I have used a microwave in the past to do this, just make sure your container is microwave safe. If you are able, a stove top works well.

lavender

While your PKO is melting, measure your lavender essential oil and lavender powder into separate containers (I always use glass for my essential and fragrance oils).

Have your mold clean, lined and at the ready.

When your PKO is melted, add the olive oil. Feeling the side of the pot, it should not be hot. A little warm is fine, but generally a the cooler the temperature the better when mixing a goat milk soap (actually, I prefer working with cool temps all the time – more time to mix).


Now, your lye mixture should be cooler to the touch and your oils cooler to the touch… think “luke-warm”.

Have your stick blender (immersion blender) at hand and ready. Slowly add your lye mixture to your oils (note: always add the lye TO the oil). Blending while you pour…

Bring your soap mixture to trace (trace is when your spoon or blender leaves a trail and takes a minute to disappear back into the mixture). Once trace has been reached, add your lavender powder, mixing, then your essential oil, mixing..

Everything should be mixed well, now pour into your mold. I do not insulate my soap, I put it on a shelf for about 24 hours before I unmold and cut. Once cut, I leave on a shelf for another 24 hours before I bevel edges.

Give it a couple weeks before using, though a good month would be best as the soap will harden up nicely over time.





Photo Credit: By kidclaude on flickr